Automotive Mileposts  

1966 Imperial
Exterior Paint Colors

1966 Imperial Paint Color Chips and Codes

EXTERIOR STRIPING COLORS

31-B Black | 31-D Pale Blue | 31-J Tan
31-M Chestnut | 31-Q Medium Red | 31-W White


PAINT CODE/COLOR

AA-1 Silver Mist
BB-1 Formal Black
CC-1 Powder Blue
DD-1 Crystal Blue
EE-1 Regal Blue
FF-1 Haze Green
GG-1 Sequoia Green
KK-1 Frost Turquoise
LL-1 Royal Turquoise
MM-1 Granite Gray (*)
PP-1 Scorch Red
QQ-1 Spanish Red
RR-1 Daffodil Yellow
SS-1 Ivory
WW-1 Persian White
XX-1 Desert Beige
YY-1 Saddle Bronze
ZZ-1 Spice Gold
33-1 Dove Tan
44-1 Moss Gold
55-1 Dusty Gold
66-1 Lilac
77-1 Ruby
88-1 Deep Plum (#)
88-1 Daffodil Yellow (#*)

PAINT CODE LEGEND

AA-1=Single Tone (Silver Mist)
BW-2=Two Tone (Black Roof/White Body)

First Letter or Number is Roof Color
Second Letter or Number is Body Color

Each 1966 Imperial was protected against the formation of rust and corrosion by Chrysler Corporation's famous 7-step, dip-and-spray process. Each car was dipped and sprayed six times in a series of cleaning, rinsing, and rush-inhibiting chemical baths. In the seventh and last step of the process, the Imperial's body is dipped 22" deep in a special corrosion-resistant primer that flows over all the lower body sheet metal and structural members, coating it thoroughly and completely, inside and out.

Once every Imperial body has completed this cleaning and rinsing process, two coats of tough epoxy primer are sprayed on, oven-baked, wet-sanded, then oven baked until dry. Following this, three coats of Acrylic Enamel paint was sprayed on and oven baked for 30 minutes to a super hard finish. The final step included hand and machine buffing of the Acrylic Enamel to a super smooth, uniform, and highly lustrous finish that was designed to last for many years.

Lustrous Acrylic Enamel paint with a special acrylic resin base is sprayed on Imperial three coats deep, oven-baked to a super-hard finish, then buffed to produce a gloss-in-depth with a mirror-like intensity. The acrylic resin base gave Imperial's enamel the ability to be buffed. This process forms a finish that is highly resistant to marring, scratching, and chipping.