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1970 Lincoln Continental
Production Numbers/Specifications

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PRODUCTION NUMBERS
INTRODUCTION DATE:
September 19, 1969
TOTAL PRODUCTION:
31,695
TOP LINE: BODY CODE/MODEL NAME/BASE PRICE
BOTTOM LINE: WEIGHT/PRODUCTION
81 - Style 65A Lincoln Continental Coupé $5976
Weight: 4,860 Built: 3,073
82 - Style 53A Lincoln Continental Sedan $6211
Weight: 4,910 Built: 28,622
82 - Style 53A Executive Limousine $--
Weight: -- Built: 17
1970 was the final year for the Executive Limousine
SPECIFICATIONS
ENGINE CODE
ENGINE DETAILS
A 460 CID 4V V-8
Bore and Stroke: 4.36" x 3.85"
Compression Ratio: 10.5:1
Brake Horsepower: 365 @ 4600 rpm
Torque: 500 ft.-lb. @ 2800 rpm
Carburetor: Autolite 4-barrel
TRANSMISSION CODE
TRANSMISSION DESCRIPTION
U SelectShift Automatic
REAR AXLE CODE
REAR AXLE RATIO
4
M (Traction-Lok)
6
O (Traction-Lok)
2.80:1
2.80:1
3.00:1
3.00:1
TIRE SIZE
BRAKES
9.15 x 15
Standard tire: Belted BSW
Original WW: 3/8" or 2 x 3/8"
Power front disc; finned and flared rear drum; dual hydraulic system
WHEELBASE
DIMENSIONS
127.0 inches
Front Tread: 64.3 inches
Rear Tread: 64.3 inches
Exterior:
Length: 225.0 inches
Width: 79.6 inches
Height: 54.5 inches (Coupé)
55.7 inches (Sedan)
Trunk: 18.1 cubic feet
Interior (Coupé - F/R):
Headroom: 38.5"/37.6"
Legroom: 41.9"/38.8"
Hiproom: 62.3"/61.4"
Shoulder room: 61.8'"/60.8"
Interior (Sedan - F/R):
Headroom: 39.0"/38.3"
Legroom: 41.9"/41.9"
Hiproom: 62.3"/62.3"
Shoulder room: 61.8'"/61.6"
SPECIFICATIONS
CAPACITIES
Distributor Point Gap: 0.017"
Distributor Dwell: 26°-31°
Idle Speed: 600 rpm
Ignition Timing: 10° BTDC
Spark Plug Gap: 0.032-0.036"
Spark Plug Torque: 15-20 lbs.-ft.
Radiator Cap: 12-15 psi
Fuel Tank: 24.0 gallons (23.0 gallons with Evaporative Emission System)
Cooling System: 19.5 quarts
Engine Oil: 5 qts. (including oil filter)
Power Steering: 3.9 pts.
Rear Axle: 5.0 pts.
SPECIAL NOTES
1970 was the first altogether new Lincoln Continental in nearly a decade. Lincoln's most visible styling trait of nearly a decade was now gone: center-opening rear doors! 1970 was first year for:
- Concealed headlamps
- Rear fender skirts (since 1960)
- Concealed electric wipers
- Locking steering column
- Headlamp doors closed light
- Vinyl-insert bodyside molding
- Bodyside paint stripe
- Automatic seatback release

America's most distinguished motorcar introduced new dimensions in spaciousness, luxury, and appointments for 1970. Despite all-new styling and bigger proportions, sales of the 1970 Lincoln Continental slipped, coming to just 82.6% of the previous year...

Image: 1970 Lincoln Continental Coupé

Above: 1970 Lincoln Continental Coupé shown in Light Blue with optional Black vinyl roof and Luxury Wheel Covers.

With all-new styling inside and out, the 1970 Lincoln Continental should have been a big hit. Base price increased by only 2.7%, despite offering more standard equipment than ever before. Surprisingly, sales fell from the previous year. In 1969, a total of 38,383 Lincoln Continentals were built. For 1970, this figure dropped to 31,695, a mere 82.6% of the previous year's sales. This happened despite arch-rival Cadillac competing with a one year old body style, and Cadillac was setting new sales records for the year. Of course, Cadillac offered a wider selection of models to choose from, which certainly broadened Cadillac's appeal.

Lincoln' s new styling was generally considered to be an evolution of the classic and much-loved design introduced for 1961, and quality control was better than ever. Interior room was more generous than ever before. So why weren't the people with the bucks buying them in record numbers? That's a tough one to answer. Sales of the Sedan would drop again slightly for 1971, but the Coupé would see an increase, although sales would still be less than in 1969. This would all change in 1972, however, when a design change was made to the rear door area on the Sedan. Instead of having the kick up at the top of the door angle up gradually, the kick up area was moved to the very rear of the door and was sharply rounded upward where it met the roof line. Full-length upper body moldings also returned, for the first time since 1969. These fairly small styling changes must have been a good ones, as sales of both Lincoln models were up for 1972. Of course, the all-new Continental Mark IV sitting next to them in dealer showrooms might have helped as well.

The 12-mile test drive and inspection process that had been in place for years was discontinued for 1970, replaced with a road test simulator and other computer-aided tests that eliminated the human interpretation from the results. Equipment was checked and adjusted daily to ensure minimal variations from the standards. Visual inspections were still performed by a human, as were checks to ensure components were operating as intended, but in areas where time could be saved by using new test procedures, and the tests would still guarantee a high quality product was delivered, these steps were taken. For instance, a new piece of test equipment pressurized the interior and stethoscopes were used to test for air leaks around the doors and windows.

In many ways, the new 1970 Lincoln was a better automobile than earlier versions, and it provided the foundation that would carry the line through the end of the decade. Big changes would be in store for Lincoln as it headed into the next decade, which ushered in an era of smaller, more fuel efficient cars. If you want full size luxury, a smooth ride and an isolated interior environment, the 1970 Lincolns are a great choice.